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Photosynthesis Research

Current research articles..




The journal Photosynthesis Research is an international journal dealing with both basic and applied aspects of photosynthesis. The journal publishes research at all levels of plant organization: molecular, subcellular, cellular, whole plant, canopy, ecosystem and global.

The publisher is Springer. The copyright and publishing rights of specialized products listed below are in this publishing house. This is also responsible for the content shown.

To search this web page for specific words type "Ctrl" + "F" on your keyboard (Command + "F" on a Mac). Then: type the word you are searching for in the window that pops up!

Additional research articles see Current Chemistry Research Articles. Magazines with similar content (photosynthesis):

 - Photosynthetica.



Photosynthesis Research - Abstracts



Expression and purification of affinity-tagged variants of the photochemical reaction center from Heliobacterium modesticaldum

Abstract

The heliobacterial photochemical reaction center (HbRC) from the chlorophototrophic Firmicutes bacterium Heliobacterium modesticaldum is the only homodimeric type I RC whose structure is known. Using genetic techniques recently established in our lab, we have developed a rapid heterologous expression system for the HbRC core polypeptide PshA. Our system relies on rescue of the non-chlorophototrophic ∆pshA::cbp2p-aph3 strain of Hbt. modesticaldum by expression of a heterologous pshA gene from a replicating shuttle vector. In addition, we constructed two tagged variants of PshA, one with an N-terminal octahistidine tag and one with an internal hexahistidine tag, which facilitate rapid purification of pure, active HbRC cores in milligram quantities. We constructed a suite of shuttle vectors bearing untagged or tagged versions of pshA driven by various promoters. Surprisingly, we found that the eno and gapDH_2 promoters from Clostridium thermocellum drive better expression of pshA than fragments of DNA derived from the region upstream of the pshA locus on the Hbt. modesticaldum genome. This “pshA rescue” strategy also provided a useful window into how Hbt. modesticaldum regulates pigment synthesis and growth rate when chlorophototrophic output decreases.


Datum: 21.09.2019


In vivo photoprotection mechanisms observed from leaf spectral absorbance changes showing VIS–NIR slow-induced conformational pigment bed changes

Abstract

Regulated heat dissipation under excessive light comprises a complexity of mechanisms, whereby the supramolecular light-harvesting pigment–protein complex (LHC) shifts state from light harvesting towards heat dissipation, quenching the excess of photo-induced excitation energy in a non-photochemical way. Based on whole-leaf spectroscopy measuring upward and downward spectral radiance fluxes, we studied spectrally contiguous (hyperspectral) transient time series of absorbance A(λ,t) and passively induced chlorophyll fluorescence F(λ,t) dynamics of intact leaves in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths (VIS–NIR, 400–800 nm) after sudden strong natural-like illumination exposure. Besides light avoidance mechanism, we observed on absorbance signatures, calculated from simultaneous reflectance R(λ,t) and transmittance T(λ,t) measurements as A(λ,t) = 1 − R(λ,t) − T(λ,t), major dynamic events with specific onsets and kinetical behaviour. A consistent well-known fast carotenoid absorbance feature (500–570 nm) appears within the first seconds to minutes, seen from both the reflected (backscattered) and transmitted (forward scattered) radiance differences. Simultaneous fast Chl features are observed, either as an increased or decreased scattering behaviour during quick light adjustment consistent with re-organizations of the membrane. The carotenoid absorbance feature shows up simultaneously with a major F decrease and corresponds to the xanthophyll conversion, as quick response to the proton gradient build-up. After xanthophyll conversion (t = 3 min), a kinetically slower but major and smooth absorbance increase was occasionally observed from the transmitted radiance measurements as wide peaks in the green (~ 550 nm) and the near-infrared (~ 750 nm) wavelengths, involving no further F quenching. Surprisingly, in relation to the response to high light, this broad and consistent VIS–NIR feature indicates a slowly induced absorbance increase with a sigmoid kinetical behaviour. In analogy to sub-leaf-level observations, we suggest that this mechanism can be explained by a structure-induced low-energy-shifted energy redistribution involving both Car and Chl. These findings might pave the way towards a further non-invasive spectral investigation of antenna conformations and their relations with energy quenching at the intact leaf level, which is, in combination with F measurements, of a high importance for assessing plant photosynthesis in vivo and in addition from remote observations.


Datum: 20.09.2019


A guide to Open-JIP, a low-cost open-source chlorophyll fluorometer

Abstract

Chlorophyll a fluorescence is the most widely used method to study photosynthesis and plant stress. While several commercial fluorometers are available, there is a need for a low-cost and highly customisable chlorophyll fluorometer. Such a device would aid in performing high-throughput assessment of photosynthesis, as these instruments can be mass-produced. Novel investigations into photosynthesis can also be performed as a result of the user’s ability to modify the devices functionality for their specific needs. Motivated by this, we present an open-source chlorophyll fluorometer based on the Kautsky induction curve (OJIP). The instrument consists of low-cost, easy-to-acquire electrical components and an open-source microcontroller (Arduino Mega) whose performance is equivalent to that of commercial instruments. Two 3D printable Open-JIP configurations are presented, one for higher plants and the other for microalgae cells in suspension. Directions for its construction are presented and the instrument is benchmarked against widely used commercial chlorophyll fluorometers.


Datum: 20.09.2019


Photosystem II core quenching in desiccated Leptolyngbya ohadii

Abstract

Cyanobacteria living in the harsh environment of the desert have to protect themselves against high light intensity and prevent photodamage. These cyanobacteria are in a desiccated state during the largest part of the day when both temperature and light intensity are high. In the desiccated state, their photosynthetic activity is stopped, whereas upon rehydration the ability to perform photosynthesis is regained. Earlier reports indicate that light-induced excitations in Leptolyngbya ohadii are heavily quenched in the desiccated state, because of a loss of structural order of the light-harvesting phycobilisome structures (Bar Eyal et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci 114:9481, 2017) and via the stably oxidized primary electron donor in photosystem I, namely P700+ (Bar Eyal et al. in Biochim Biophys Acta Bioenergy 1847:1267–1273, 2015). In this study, we use picosecond fluorescence experiments to demonstrate that a third protection mechanism exists, in which the core of photosystem II is quenched independently.


Datum: 18.09.2019


A photosynthesis-inspired supramolecular system: caging photosensitizer and photocatalyst in apoferritin

Abstract

Inspired by the bioinorganic structure of natural [FeFe]-hydrogenase ([FeFe]-H2ase) that possesses iron sulfur clusters to catalyze proton reduction to hydrogen (H2), we design a supramolecular photosystem by sequentially integrating hydrophobic ruthenium complex (as a photosensitizer) and diiron dithiolate complex (as a photocatalyst) into the inner surface or cavity of apoferritin via noncovalent interactions. This platform allows photosensitizer and catalyst to localize in a close proximity and short-distance electron transfer process to occur within a confined space. The resulted uniform core–shell nanocomposites were stable and well dispersed in water, and showed enhanced H2 generation activity in acidic solution as compared to the homogenous system without apoferritin participation.

Graphic abstract


Datum: 14.09.2019


Cyclic electron flow and light partitioning between the two photosystems in leaves of plants with different functional types

Abstract

Cyclic electron flow (CEF) around photosystem I (PSI) is essential for generating additional ATP and enhancing efficient photosynthesis. Accurate estimation of CEF requires knowledge of the fractions of absorbed light by PSI (fI) and PSII (fII), which are only known for a few model species such as spinach. No measures of fI are available for C4 grasses under different irradiances. We developed a new method to estimate (1) fII in vivo by concurrently measuring linear electron flux through both photosystems \(\left( {{\text{LEF}}_{{{\text{O}}_{ 2} }} } \right)\) in leaf using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) and total electron flux through PSII (ETR2) using chlorophyll fluorescence by a Dual-PAM at low light and (2) CEF as ETR1— \({\text{LEF}}_{{{\text{O}}_{ 2} }}\) . For a C3 grass, fI was 0.5 and 0.4 under control (high light) and shade conditions, respectively. C4 species belonging to NADP-ME and NAD-ME subtypes had fI of 0.6 and PCK subtype had 0.5 under control. All shade-grown C4 species had fI of 0.6 except for NADP-ME grass which had 0.7. It was also observed that fI ranged between 0.3 and 0.5 for gymnosperm, liverwort and fern species. CEF increased with irradiance and was induced at lower irradiances in C4 grasses and fern relative to other species. CEF was greater in shade-grown plants relative to control plants except for C4 NADP-ME species. Our study reveals a range of CEF and fI values in different plant functional groups. This variation must be taken into account for improved photosynthetic calculations and modelling.


Datum: 13.09.2019


Synthesis of water-soluble Ni(II) complexes and their role in photo-induced electron transfer with MPA-CdTe quantum dots

Abstract

Photocatalytic water splitting using solar energy for hydrogen production offers a promising alternative form of storable and clean energy for the future. To design an artificial photosynthesis system that is cost-effective and scalable, earth abundant elements must be used to develop each of the components of the assembly. To develop artificial photosynthetic systems, we need to couple a catalyst for proton reduction to a photosensitizer and understand the mechanism of photo-induced electron transfer from the photosensitizer to the catalyst that serves as the fundamental step for photocatalysis. Therefore, our work is focused on the study of light driven electron transfer kinetics from the quantum dot systems made with inorganic chalcogenides in the presence of Ni-based reduction catalysts. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of four Ni(II) complexes of tetradentate ligands with amine and pyridine functionalities (N2/Py2) and their interactions with CdTe quantum dots stabilized by 3-mercaptopropionic acid. The lifetime of the quantum dots was investigated in the presence of the Ni complexes and absorbance, emission and electrochemical measurements were performed to gain a deeper understanding of the photo-induced electron transfer process.

Graphic abstract


Datum: 09.09.2019


Four distinct trimeric forms of light-harvesting complex II isolated from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

Abstract

Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) absorbs light energy and transfers it primarily to photosystem II in green algae and land plants. Although the trimeric structure of LHCII is conserved between the two lineages, its subunit composition and function are believed to differ significantly. In this study, we purified four LHCII trimers from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and analyzed their biochemical properties. We used several preparation methods to obtain four distinct fractions (fractions 1–4), each of which contained an LHCII trimer with different contents of Type I, III, and IV proteins. The pigment compositions of the LHCIIs in the four fractions were similar. The absorption and fluorescence spectra were also similar, although the peak positions differed slightly. These results indicate that this green alga contains four types of LHCII trimer with different biochemical and spectroscopic features. Based on these findings, we discuss the function and structural organization of green algal LHCII antennae.


Datum: 06.09.2019


The endogenous redox rhythm is controlled by a central circadian oscillator in cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942

Abstract

The intracellular redox and the circadian clock in photosynthetic organisms are two major regulators globally affecting various biological functions. Both of the global control systems have evolved as systems to adapt to regularly or irregularly changing light environments. Here, we report that the two global regulators mutually interact in cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, a model photosynthetic organism whose clock molecular mechanism is well known. Electrochemical assay using a transmembrane electron mediator revealed that intracellular redox of S. elongatus PCC7942 cell exhibited circadian rhythms under constant light conditions. The redox rhythm disappeared when transcription/translation of clock genes is defunctionalized, indicating that the transcription/translation controlled by a core KaiABC oscillator generates the circadian redox rhythm. Importantly, the amplitude of the redox rhythm at a constant light condition was large enough to affect the KaiABC oscillator. The findings indicated that the intracellular redox state is actively controlled to change in a 24-h cycle under constant light conditions by the circadian clock system.


Datum: 04.09.2019


Near-infrared in vitro measurements of photosystem I cofactors and electron-transfer partners with a recently developed spectrophotometer

Abstract

A kinetic-LED-array-spectrophotometer (Klas) was recently developed for measuring in vivo redox changes of P700, plastocyanin (PCy), and ferredoxin (Fd) in the near-infrared (NIR). This spectrophotometer is used in the present work for in vitro light-induced measurements with various combinations of photosystem I (PSI) from tobacco and two different cyanobacteria, spinach plastocyanin, cyanobacterial cytochrome c6 (cyt. c6), and Fd. It is shown that cyt. c6 oxidation contributes to the NIR absorption changes. The reduction of (FAFB), the terminal electron acceptor of PSI, was also observed and the shape of the (FAFB) NIR difference spectrum is similar to that of Fd. The NIR difference spectra of the electron-transfer cofactors were compared between different organisms and to those previously measured in vivo, whereas the relative absorption coefficients of all cofactors were determined by using single PSI turnover conditions. Thus, the (840 nm minus 965 nm) extinction coefficients of the light-induced species (oxidized minus reduced for PC and cyt. c6, reduced minus oxidized for (FAFB), and Fd) were determined with values of 0.207 ± 0.004, – 0.033 ± 0.006, – 0.036 ± 0.008, and – 0.021 ± 0.005 for PCy, cyt. c6, (FAFB) (single reduction), and Fd, respectively, by taking a reference value of + 1 for P700+. The fact that the NIR P700 coefficient is larger than that of PCy and much larger than that of other contributing species, combined with the observed variability in the NIR P700 spectral shape, emphasizes that deconvolution of NIR signals into different components requires a very precise determination of the P700 spectrum.


Datum: 03.09.2019


Function of the IsiA pigment–protein complex in vivo

Abstract

The acclimation of cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus to iron deficiency is crucial for their performance under limiting conditions. In many cyanobacterial species, one of the major responses to iron deficiency is the induction of isiA. The function of the IsiA pigment–protein complex has been the subject of intensive research. In this study of the model Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 strain, we probe the accumulation of the pigment–protein complex and its effects on in vivo photosynthetic performance. We provide evidence that in this organism the dominant factor controlling IsiA accumulation is the intracellular iron concentration and not photo-oxidative stress or redox poise. These findings support the use of IsiA as a tool for assessing iron bioavailability in environmental studies. We also present evidence demonstrating that the IsiA pigment–protein complex exerts only small effects on the performance of the reaction centers. We propose that its major function is as a storage depot able to hold up to 50% of the cellular chlorophyll content during transition into iron limitation. During recovery from iron limitation, chlorophyll is released from the complex and used for the reconstruction of photosystems. Therefore, the IsiA pigment–protein complex can play a critical role not only when cells transition into iron limitation, but also in supporting efficient recovery of the photosynthetic apparatus in the transition back out of the iron-limited state.


Datum: 01.09.2019


Exogenous putrescine alleviates photoinhibition caused by salt stress through cooperation with cyclic electron flow in cucumber

Abstract

When plants suffer from abiotic stresses, cyclic electron flow (CEF) is induced for photo-protection. Putrescine (Put), a primary polyamine in chloroplasts, plays a critical role in stress tolerance. However, the relationship between CEF and Put in chloroplasts for photo-protection is unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of Put-induced CEF for salt tolerance in cucumber plants (Cucumis sativus L). Treatment with 90 mM NaCl and/or Put did not influence the maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm), but the photoactivity of PSI was severely inhibited by NaCl. Salt stress induced a high level of CEF; moreover, plants treated with both NaCl and Put exhibited much higher CEF activity and ATP accumulation than those exhibited by single-salt-treated plants to provide an adequate ATP/NADPH ratio for plant growth. Furthermore, Put decreased the trans-membrane proton gradient (ΔpH), which was accompanied by reduced pH-dependent non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and an increased the effective quantum yield of PSII (Y(II)). The ratio of NADP+/NADPH increased significantly with Put in salt-stressed leaves compared with the ratio in leaves treated with NaCl, indicating that Put relieved over-reduction pressure at the PSI acceptor side caused by salt stress. Collectively, our results suggest that exogenous Put creates an excellent condition for CEF promotion: a large amount of pmf is predominantly stored as Δψ, resulting in moderate lumen pH and low NPQ, while maintaining high rates of ATP synthesis (high pmf).


Datum: 01.09.2019


Consequences of saturation mutagenesis of the protein ligand to the B-side monomeric bacteriochlorophyll in reaction centers from Rhodobacter capsulatus

Abstract

In bacterial reaction centers (RCs), photon-induced initial charge separation uses an A-side bacteriochlorophyll (BChl, BA) and bacteriopheophytin (BPh, HA), while the near-mirror image B-side BB and HB cofactors are inactive. Two new sets of Rhodobacter capsulatus RC mutants were designed, both bearing substitution of all amino acids for the native histidine M180 (M-polypeptide residue 180) ligand to the core Mg ion of BB. Residues are identified that largely result in retention of a BChl in the BB site (Asp, Ser, Pro, Gln, Asn, Gly, Cys, Lys, and Thr), ones that largely harbor the Mg-free BPh in the BB site (Leu and Ile), and ones for which isolated RCs are comprised of a substantial mixture of these two RC types (Ala, Glu, Val, Met and, in one set, Arg). No protein was isolated when M180 is Trp, Tyr, Phe, or (in one set) Arg. These findings are corroborated by ground state spectra, pigment extractions, ultrafast transient absorption studies, and the yields of B-side transmembrane charge separation. The changes in coordination chemistries did not reveal an RC with sufficiently precise poising of the redox properties of the BB-site cofactor to result in a high yield of B-side electron transfer to HB. Insights are gleaned into the amino acid properties that support BChl in the BB site and into the widely observed multi-exponential decay of the excited state of the primary electron donor. The results also have direct implications for tuning free energies of the charge-separated intermediates in RCs and mimetic systems.


Datum: 01.09.2019


Effects of excess light energy on excitation-energy dynamics in a pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

Abstract

Controlling excitation energy flow is a fundamental ability of photosynthetic organisms to keep a better performance of photosynthesis. Among the organisms, diatoms have unique light-harvesting complexes, fucoxanthin chlorophyll (Chl) a/c-binding proteins. We have recently investigated light-adaptation mechanisms of a marine centric diatom, Chaetoceros gracilis, by spectroscopic techniques. However, it remains unclear how pennate diatoms regulate excitation energy under different growth light conditions. Here, we studied light-adaptation mechanisms in a marine pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown at 30 µmol photons m−2 s−1 and further incubated for 24 h either in the dark, or at 30 or 300 µmol photons m−2 s−1 light intensity, by time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) spectroscopy. The high-light incubated cells showed no detectable oxygen-evolving activity of photosystem II, indicating the occurrence of a severe photodamage. The photodamaged cells showed alterations of steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra and TRF spectra compared with the dark and low-light adapted cells. In particular, excitation-energy quenching is significantly accelerated in the photodamaged cells as shown by mean lifetime analysis of the Chl fluorescence. These spectral changes by the high-light treatment may result from arrangements of pigment–protein complexes to maintain the photosynthetic performance under excess light illumination. These growth-light dependent spectral properties in P. tricornutum are largely different from those in C. gracilis, thus providing insights into the different light-adaptation mechanisms between the pennate and centric diatoms.


Datum: 01.09.2019


Cellular localization of tolyporphins, unusual tetrapyrroles, in a microbial photosynthetic community determined using hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy

Abstract

The cyanobacterial culture HT-58-2, composed of a filamentous cyanobacterium and accompanying community bacteria, produces chlorophyll a as well as the tetrapyrrole macrocycles known as tolyporphins. Almost all known tolyporphins (A–M except K) contain a dioxobacteriochlorin chromophore and exhibit an absorption spectrum somewhat similar to that of chlorophyll a. Here, hyperspectral confocal fluorescence microscopy was employed to noninvasively probe the locale of tolyporphins within live cells under various growth conditions (media, illumination, culture age). Cultures grown in nitrate-depleted media (BG-110 vs. nitrate-rich, BG-11) are known to increase the production of tolyporphins by orders of magnitude (rivaling that of chlorophyll a) over a period of 30–45 days. Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) was applied to an image set containing images from each condition to obtain pure component spectra of the endogenous pigments. The relative abundances of these components were then calculated for individual pixels in each image in the entire set, and 3D-volume renderings were obtained. At 30 days in media with or without nitrate, the chlorophyll a and phycobilisomes (combined phycocyanin and phycobilin components) co-localize in the filament outer cytoplasmic region. Tolyporphins localize in a distinct peripheral pattern in cells grown in BG-110 versus a diffuse pattern (mimicking the chlorophyll a localization) upon growth in BG-11. In BG-110, distinct puncta of tolyporphins were commonly found at the septa between cells and at the end of filaments. This work quantifies the relative abundance and envelope localization of tolyporphins in single cells, and illustrates the ability to identify novel tetrapyrroles in the presence of chlorophyll a in a photosynthetic microorganism within a non-axenic culture.


Datum: 01.09.2019


Exploring the low photosynthetic efficiency of cyanobacteria in blue light using a mutant lacking phycobilisomes

Abstract

The ubiquitous chlorophyll a (Chl a) pigment absorbs both blue and red light. Yet, in contrast to green algae and higher plants, most cyanobacteria have much lower photosynthetic rates in blue than in red light. A plausible but not yet well-supported hypothesis is that blue light results in limited energy transfer to photosystem II (PSII), because cyanobacteria invest most Chl a in photosystem I (PSI), whereas their phycobilisomes (PBS) are mostly associated with PSII but do not absorb blue photons. In this paper, we compare the photosynthetic performance in blue and orange-red light of wildtype Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and a PBS-deficient mutant. Our results show that the wildtype had much lower biomass, Chl a content, PSI:PSII ratio and O2 production rate per PSII in blue light than in orange-red light, whereas the PBS-deficient mutant had a low biomass, Chl a content, PSI:PSII ratio, and O2 production rate per PSII in both light colors. More specifically, the wildtype displayed a similar low photosynthetic efficiency in blue light as the PBS-deficient mutant in both light colors. Our results demonstrate that the absorption of light energy by PBS and subsequent transfer to PSII are crucial for efficient photosynthesis in cyanobacteria, which may explain both the low photosynthetic efficiency of PBS-containing cyanobacteria and the evolutionary success of chlorophyll-based light-harvesting antennae in environments dominated by blue light.


Datum: 01.09.2019


Relative stability of the S 2 isomers of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II

Abstract

The oxidation of water to O2 is catalyzed by the Oxygen Evolving Complex (OEC), a Mn4CaO5 complex in Photosystem II (PSII). The OEC is sequentially oxidized from state S0 to S4. The S2 state, (MnIII)(MnIV)3, coexists in two redox isomers: S2,g=2, where Mn4 is MnIV and S2,g=4.1, where Mn1 is MnIV. Mn4 has two terminal water ligands, whose proton affinity is affected by the Mn oxidation state. The relative energy of the two S2 redox isomers and the protonation state of the terminal water ligands are analyzed using classical multi-conformer continuum electrostatics (MCCE). The Monte Carlo simulations are done on QM/MM optimized S1 and S2 structures docked back into the complete PSII, keeping the protonation state of the protein at equilibrium with the OEC redox and protonation states. Wild-type PSII, chloride-depleted PSII, PSII in the presence of oxidized YZ/protonated D1-H190, and the PSII mutants D2-K317A, D1-D61A, and D1-S169A are studied at pH 6. The wild-type PSII at pH 8 is also described. In qualitative agreement with experiment, in wild-type PSII, the S2,g=2 redox isomer is the lower energy state; while chloride depletion or pH 8 stabilizes the S2,g=4.1 state and the mutants D2-K317A, D1-D61A, and D1-S169A favor the S2,g=2 state. The protonation states of D1-E329, D1-E65, D1-H337, D1-D61, and the terminal waters on Mn4 (W1 and W2) are affected by the OEC oxidation state. The terminal W2 on Mn4 is a mixture of water and hydroxyl in the S2,g=2 state, indicating the two water protonation states have similar energy, while it remains neutral in the S1 and S2,g=4.1 states. In wild-type PSII, advancement to S2 leads to negligible proton loss and so there is an accumulation of positive charge. In the analyzed mutations and Cl depleted PSII, additional deprotonation is found upon formation of S2 state.


Datum: 01.09.2019


Snapshot transient absorption spectroscopy: toward in vivo investigations of nonphotochemical quenching mechanisms

Abstract

Although the importance of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) on photosynthetic biomass production and crop yields is well established, the in vivo operation of the individual mechanisms contributing to overall NPQ is still a matter of controversy. In order to investigate the timescale and activation dynamics of specific quenching mechanisms, we have developed a technique called snapshot transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy, which can monitor molecular species involved in the quenching response with a time resolution of 30 s. Using intact thylakoid membrane samples, we show how conventional TA kinetic and spectral analyses enable the determination of the appropriate wavelength and time delay for snapshot TA experiments. As an example, we show how the chlorophyll-carotenoid charge transfer and excitation energy transfer mechanisms can be monitored based on signals corresponding to the carotenoid (Car) radical cation and Car S1 excited state absorption, respectively. The use of snapshot TA spectroscopy together with the previously reported fluorescence lifetime snapshot technique (Sylak-Glassman et al. in Photosynth Res 127:69–76, 2016) provides valuable information such as the concurrent appearance of specific quenching species and overall quenching of excited Chl. Furthermore, we show that the snapshot TA technique can be successfully applied to completely intact photosynthetic organisms such as live cells of Nannochloropsis. This demonstrates that the snapshot TA technique is a valuable method for tracking the dynamics of intact samples that evolve over time, such as the photosynthetic system in response to high-light exposure.


Datum: 01.09.2019


Dynamics of regulated YNPQ and non-regulated YNO energy dissipation in sunflower leaves exposed to sinusoidal lights

Abstract

Better understanding of photosynthetic efficiency under fluctuating light requires a specific approach to characterize the dynamics of energy dissipation in photosystem II. In this study, we characterized the interaction between the regulated YNPQ and non-regulated YNO energy dissipation in outdoor- and indoor-grown sunflower leaves exposed to repetitive cycles of sinusoidal lights of five amplitudes (200, 400, 600, 800, 1000 µmol m−2 s−1) and periods (20, 40, 60, 90, 120 s). The different light cycles induced various patterns of ChlF emission, from which were calculated the complementary quantum yields of photochemical energy conversion YII, light-regulated YNPQ, and non-regulated YNO non-photochemical energy dissipation. During the light cycles, YNO varied in complex but small patterns relative to those of YNPQ, whose variations were mostly mirrored by changes in YII. The YNO patterns could be decomposed by fast Fourier transform into a main (MH) and several upper harmonics (UH). Concerning YNPQ dynamics, they were described by sinusoidal regressions with two components, one constant during the light cycles but increasing with the average light intensity (YNPQc), and one variable (YNPQv). Formation and relaxation of YNPQv followed the intensity of the sinusoidal lights, with lags ranging from 5 to 13 s. These lags decreased with the amplitude of the incident light, and were shorter by 37% in outdoor than indoor leaves. YNPQv and UHs responses to the growth conditions, amplitudes, and the periods of the sinusoidal light were closely correlated (r = 0.939), whereas MH and YNPQc varied similarly (r = 0.803). The analysis of ChlF induced by sinusoidal lights may be a useful tool to better understand the dynamics of energy dissipation in PSII under fluctuating lights.


Datum: 01.09.2019


Slow induction of chlorophyll a fluorescence excited by blue and red light in Tradescantia leaves acclimated to high and low light

Abstract

Tradescantia is a good model for assaying induction events in higher plant leaves. Chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence serves as a sensitive reporter of the functional state of photosynthetic apparatus in chloroplasts. The fluorescence time-course depends on the leaf growth conditions and actinic light quality. In this work, we investigated slow induction of Chl a fluorescence (SIF) excited by blue light (BL, λmax = 455 nm) or red light (RL, λmax = 630 nm) in dark-adapted leaves of Tradescantia fluminensis acclimated to high light (~ 1000 µmol photons m−2 s−1; HL) or low light (~ 100 µmol photons m−2 s−1; LL). Our special interest was focused on the contribution of the avoidance response to SIF kinetics. Bearing in mind that BL and RL have different impacts on photoreceptors that initiate chloroplast movements within the cell (accumulation/avoidance responses), we have compared the SIF patterns during the action of BL and RL. The time-courses of SIF and kinetics of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of Chl a fluorescence revealed a certain difference when leaves were illuminated by BL or RL. In both cases, the yield of fluorescence rose to the maximal level P and then, after the lag-phase P–S–M1, the fluorescence level decreased toward the steady state T (via the intermediate phases M1–M2 and M2–T). In LL-acclimated leaves, the duration of the P–S–M1 phase was almost two times longer that in HL-grown plants. In the case of BL, the fluorescence decay included the transient phase M1–M2. This phase was obscure during the RL illumination. Non-photochemical quenching of Chl a fluorescence has been quantified as \( {\text{NPQ}} = F_{\text{m}}^{ 0} /F^{\prime}_{\text{m}} - 1 \) , where \( F_{\text{m}}^{ 0} \) and \( F^{\prime}_{\text{m}} \) stand for the fluorescence response to saturating pulses of light applied to dark-adapted and illuminated samples, respectively. The time-courses of such a formally determined NPQ value were markedly different during the action of RL and BL. In LL-grown leaves, BL induced higher NPQ as compared to the action of RL. In HL-grown plants, the difference between the NPQ responses to BL and RL illumination was insignificant. Comparing the peculiarities of Chl a fluorescence induced by BL and RL, we conclude that the avoidance response can provide a marked contribution to SIF and NPQ generation. The dependence of NPQ on the quality of actinic light suggests that chloroplast movements within the cell have a noticeable impact on the formally determined NPQ value. Analyzing kinetics of post-illumination decay of NPQ in the context of solar stress resistance, we have found that LL-acclimated Tradescantia leaves are more vulnerable to strong light than the HL-grown leaves.


Datum: 21.08.2019


 


Category: Current Chemistry Research

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